Training Tip Tuesday – Leash Skills (Part 3)

TRAINING TIP TUESDAY – leash skills

By: Margaux Meyer

The Volunteer Trainers at Ruff Start Rescue have started a new initiative to post a quick and easy tip every Tuesday! Look for a new tip every Tuesday or use the hashtag #TrainingTipTuesday on social media to find them all!
For #TrainingTipTuesday, I’m back for another tip on leash skills!
A good way to begin practicing leash skills is to start practicing in short sessions in easy places without the distractions of a regular walk.
Easy Space: Start practicing loose leash walking in a place that’s easy for your dog to concentrate. Instead of starting on the street with lots of distractions and new smells, first practice inside your house, in your yard, or driveway or parking lot. Walk in circles or in a regular pattern and encourage your dog to walk near you, giving treats and rewarding when they’re close or the lease is loose. The goal is to help the dog stay engaged with you and stay close.
Short Sessions: When you first start leash training, practice for just a few minutes every few days. Don’t stress about making every walk a loose leash walk— know that leash skills will be built over weeks and months. Practice a few minutes a day separately from your normal potty or exercise walks. If you or the dog get frustrated, take a few days off and next time you practice for a shorter amount of time.
Before the Leash: Sometimes the leash is distracting and engrained as a bad habit. Try practicing walking with an extra long leash or no leash at all. Keep the dog engaged with you by treating frequently, walking fast then slow, and changing direction. Every time the dog looks at you, give them a treat. The goal is to encourage the dog to stay engaged and close to you, which you can build on when you add a leash or move outside.
Some dogs pull for the first half of a walk but settle for the second half. That’s great! Reward your dog for walking well the second half of the walk — they’ll slowly get the picture and will start to walk a little better earlier.
Don’t forget your treats! Bring 1-2 cups of treats (or maybe part of the dog’s dinner!) to make sure you are rewarding constantly.
Here’s a video I like that shows how to start practicing leash skills :
Blog and graphic by Margaux Meyer, one of Ruff Start Rescue’s volunteer trainers, who focus on supporting our fosters and helping create successful dogs. She owns and operates A Better Walk Dog Training (abetterwalk.Squarespace.com).

National Deaf Dog Awareness Week – Tips on training your deaf dog

national deaf dog awareness week – training tips

By: Maureen Hoopes

The idea of training a deaf dog may seem overwhelming. The good news is that training a deaf dog is very similar to traditional dog training. We just focus on a few important differences. First, we work on clear communication using a visual marker. If you are familiar with clicker training, the concept is the same, but we use a visual marker instead since deaf dogs can’t hear the click. There are three types of visual markers commonly used with deaf dogs. Full hand flash, three-finger hand flash, and a thumbs up. 

Once we have established a clear communication style, there are five must-have behaviors/cues that all deaf dogs need to know and three absolute NoNos. Natalie at K9 Concepts has a fabulous Youtube series of deaf dog training videos. You can access this link below, which provides details on how to train these behaviors/cues. https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLFQBPCVgcvbMZjGsMCiCeeFbpfCrPxmgt 

Do teach your deaf dog the following:

  1.     Check-in behaviors are achieved by rewarding your pup each time they look in your direction. Begin working on this behavior in areas with minimal distractions, such as different rooms in your home and your backyard. Once mastered, take it on the road, starting with areas with fewer distractions and increasing as your deaf dog shows you their capabilities. 
  2.     Tactile orientation video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6Lq7MJ6dtkhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=f6Lq7MJ6dtk&list=PLFQBPCVgcvbMZjGsMCiCeeFbpfCrPxmgt&index=2
  3.     Double tug recall video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-0osjFKPkWE&list=PLFQBPCVgcvbMZjGsMCiCeeFbpfCrPxmgt&index=3
  4.     The disengagement game for dogs video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=73Ab4c6CCyY&list=PLFQBPCVgcvbMZjGsMCiCeeFbpfCrPxmgt&index=4
  5.     Settle on a bed/in a crate video: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bkGy5sovAOQ&t=13s

 Do not use the following with deaf dogs;

  • Flashlights
  • Laser pointers
  • Vibration collars

Flashlights and Laser pointers can contribute to Abnormal Repetitive Behaviors, known as ARC, in deaf dogs that cause anxiety over reflective lights, shadows, and more. Vibration collars can scare or startle deaf dogs. We always want to build confidence in all dogs, deaf and hearing, so this would be counterproductive to that end. 

Using the training listed above will help you on your path to successfully training your deaf dog.  For additional tips on this and other training topics, please reach out to Ruff Start Rescue, or your local trainer.

Happy training!

Blog and graphic by Maureen Hoopes, one of Ruff Start Rescue’s volunteer trainers, who focus on supporting our fosters and helping create successful dogs.

Training Tip Tuesday – Crate Training

TRAINING TIP TUESDAY – brain games

By: Maureen Hoopes

The Volunteer Trainers at Ruff Start Rescue have started a new initiative to post a quick and easy tip every Tuesday! Look for a new tip every Tuesday or use the hashtag #TrainingTipTuesday on social media to find them all!
A crate is a great management tool for puppies/dogs and introduced correctly will become a space your pup enjoys spending time in and actively seeks out when they want to rest or have some time away from the rest of the household. Crate training can help speed up the process of teaching your pup where to go to the toilet, how to relax when you leave them and prevent them from chewing furniture, electric cables or other items if you need to leave the room to go to the bathroom, answer the door or make a coffee.
In this tutorial you are going to learn how to introduce a crate to your pup and ensure that they LOVE going into it.
To prepare make sure that your pup’s crate is lined with something cozy and soft, like non slip bedding so that it’s inviting and warm.
Step 1 is going to be to have the crate on the floor with you sitting on the floor close by. Allow your pup to choose to come over and investigate. If your pup sniffs it or moves to investigate, praise them and reward with some tasty treats too. If your pup is hesitant don’t worry, give them time to go at their own pace and reward them where they are comfortable being. Play is a great way to boost confidence. Either play with their favorite toy nearby the crate or if they are more food motivated you can play with food too, by tossing it to one side for your pup to go get and when they come back toss a treat to the other side of the crate. At this stage all movement is outside of the crate.
Step 2 is getting your pup to happily step into the crate. You can either sprinkle some treats just inside of the crate and let your pup approach to eat them, or an alternative if you’re playing with toys is to toss the toy so it lands partly in the crate and your pup gets to lean inside the crate a little to pick it up.
When your pup is happy with this stage and is running towards the crate without hesitation you can move to getting your pup to step further into the crate. Either sprinkle treats further back in the crate or throw their toy inside a bit more to encourage them to move further inside. If you are noticing your pup leaning to try and get to their reward without stepping, it’s a sign that it’s too difficult for your pup right now. Move back to the previous step and keep practicing. You can step up and down the different steps at your pup’s pace. Spending time getting this right now will help your pup build a great association with their crate.
Step 3 is all about building up duration. As your pup goes into the crate to get a treat they will turn around inside before coming out. At this point meet their nose at the entrance and feed them a bonus treat before they leave. This will extend the time they are in the crate by a second or two. Gradually you can start to feed a couple of treats, on after another in this way to increase duration further. You will find that your pup chooses to hang out in the crate for longer hoping more treats will be delivered. Continue to build duration in this way using up to 5 small treats each time. You can start to lengthen the time between delivering treats so your pup remains happily in their crate for longer each time until your pup is choosing to stay in their crate for 30 seconds.
Step 4 is all about getting your pup used to the crate door being moved. To start with you’re not closing the door at this stage but simply moving it a little when your pup is happily eating treats inside the crate. They’ll be aware of the sound, vibrations and sight of the crate door moving and should be relaxed throughout. You can then start to close the door over more and practice closing the catch or doing up the zip a little if you have a canvas crate. If your pup starts to panic or tries to leave it just means you’re going too quickly. Drop back a step and help your pup to build up their confidence more before proceeding.
Step 5 – Once you’ve built up to your pup being happy to be in their crate whilst you close the door the next stage is building duration so your pup is happy to relax with their crate door closed. Throughout this stage you are going to be right next to the crate to support your pup. Set your pup up with a long lasting chew to enjoy inside the crate, like a bully stick or a stuffed Kong. Whilst they’re settled in their crate you can sit on the sofa next to the crate and either pop on the tv or read a book. You’ll want to practice this on several occasions before moving to the next stage.
Step 6 is all about you moving away from the crate whilst your pup is relaxing with their chew and it not being a big deal. Whilst your pup is busy chewing, start to get up and move around the room before sitting back down on the sofa again. Move to different areas of the room and back each time. You don’t need to say anything to your pup as you do this. Pick up a magazine from the table, turn the lights on, switch the tv on or tidy away items. If your pup watches you at first they will soon get used to things happening around them and go back to their chew instead.
Step 7 is where you can start to leave the room with your pup settled in their crate with something to do. Start with short durations, like going to the bathroom, or taking a quick shower and then build up to longer durations. If your pup can happily settle in their crate for a few minutes, move to 15 minutes, then 30 minutes. Practice increasing the duration gradually in 15 minute intervals and if you’re leaving your pup for any length of time ensure that they have eaten, exercised, had a chance to toilet and are relaxed before you go.
As always go at your pup’s pace, have fun and enjoy the journey.
For more information on crate training go to [Housesoiling | Dog Star Daily] (https://www.dogstardaily.com/training/housesoiling-0)
Blog and graphic by Maureen Hoopes, one of Ruff Start Rescue’s volunteer trainers, who focus on supporting our fosters and helping create successful dogs.

Puppy strangles – What is it? What causes it?

Puppy strangles

By: Samantha Sommers

Puppy strangles, more formally known as Juvenile Cellulitis, is an uncommon skin condition that mostly affects young puppies. It is a painful disease that can be life-threatening if left untreated. 

The underlying cause of puppy strangles is currently unknown, but veterinarian experts believe it to be an immune system malfunction. The condition is not contagious to other dogs or humans. If left untreated, the skin lesions associated with puppy strangles may spread to other areas of the body. In severe cases, the condition may cause secondary infections that require additional treatment or cause so much discomfort that the puppy may stop eating and drinking altogether. 

The first symptom of puppy strangles is usually swelling around the face and muzzle, which can lead to raised pimple-like bumps around the face, muzzle, and ears. Other symptoms include:

  • Lethargy or depression 
  • Fever
  • Lameness
  • Loss of appetite 
  • Swelling of the face
  • Swelling of lymph nodes, especially on the side of the neck 

The good news is that once diagnosed, treatment of puppy strangles is very effective and most cases are resolved with a single course of oral steroid medication. Antibiotics may also be prescribed to treat any secondary infections caused by puppy strangles.

Fortunately, this disease is uncommon, but it does happen, and the signs are not always immediately obvious.

violeta’s story

Violeta was diagnosed with a rare disease that could have cost her her life without the watchful eye of her foster family.

On any given day, you would expect to find Violeta, a 9-month-old Shepard/Pit Bull mix playing in her pool, watching squirrels with her housemate, quietly chewing on her stuffies, or running like a deer in the yard – full of puppy energy and happiness! 

Here’s a video of Violeta enjoying her pool!

One day, Violeta’s foster family noticed something not quite right. She was lethargic, not eating, and didn’t have the same bursting energy as she usually would. At that time, they rushed her to Vet Partners in Plymouth, a partner clinic of Ruff Start. There, they took x-rays and blood samples, ruling out a foreign body being the root of the problem. A few days later, the symptoms were still apparent, and she had a fever. At that time, the vet had prescribed some antibiotics and pain medication in hopes of healing the problem.

Weeks later, the symptoms returned, along with some severe swelling around her neck. Feeling very concerned and uncertain, the foster returned to the vet with Violeta, knowing there must be something more to these recurring issues. At that time, it was time to consider all the options. The vet took a sample of the lump using a fine needle aspirate to rule out an abscess. Under careful examination of the sample, the vet determined that the swelling was inflammatory tissue and diagnosed Violetta with puppy strangles.

Puppy strangles is an uncommon skin condition that typically affects puppies four months or younger. It is a painful disease that can be life-threatening if left untreated. 

With steroids and the love of her foster home, Violeta is now on the mend for this extremely rare diagnosis. She is now resting, healing, and waiting to find her family! Apply to adopt Violeta today:  https://ruffstartrescue.org/view-pet?id=17849233

In rescue, we never know what to expect. We are lucky that our fosters, veterinarian team, and partner clinics are always willing to go the extra mile to ensure the health and safety of the animals in our care. If it’s within your means to help with Violeta’s medical costs and other animals in our care, please donate today! We couldn’t do this without your support.

Culvert Cal – Right turn to Ruff Start

Meet Culvert Cat –

This little guy took the right turn at the right time, into the hands of a determined Ruff Start team to help him into rescue.
Our office manager, Cassie, was driving near our office and saw a kitten running down the road. She stopped the van and put out an S.O.S. for all available staff to help capture it. The kitten was scared and took off into the woods.
After looking for several minutes, someone driving by stopped to ask what was happening, and they explained the situation. The driver drove on to the end of the block and stopped at the intersection, and then shouted, “It’s over here!” pointing into a thicket of bush.
They ran over and heard a tiny “meow.” Cassie decided that the kitten might have hidden in a culvert and climbed into the creekbed to check. She saw that the kitten had run almost halfway down the culvert before it hit standing water, curled into a ball midway in the water, terrified. In case the kitten ran the other way, the other RSRers ran across the road to the other side of the culvert. Cassie got on her stomach and army-crawled toward the kitten until she could finally reach him. She turned around in the tunnel, holding the kitten in front of her with one hand, and crawled back out.
They brought the kitten straight to our fantastic vetting team. They gave him the full range of care he needed. He was estimated to be about 8 weeks old, underweight, dehydrated, and had puncture wounds on his side. Presumably, he was bitten by some creature and managed to get away. We don’t know how long this little guy was outside alone, but we knew we had found him just in time. He was appropriately named Culvert Cal!
Cal is in foster and has turned out to be the sweetest. He purrs, cuddles, makes biscuits, uses his litter box like a pro and loves mealtime. Once he gains some weight, he will be available for adoption.
There is never a dull moment in the rescue world or a moment without a new soul to take care of. If it is within your means, please consider donating to our Animal Care Fund to help Culvert Cal and others like him!

Training Tip Tuesday – Brain Games

TRAINING TIP TUESDAY – brain games

By: Kelly Erick

The Volunteer Trainers at Ruff Start Rescue have started a new initiative to post a quick and easy tip every Tuesday! Look for a new tip every Tuesday or use the hashtag #TrainingTipTuesday on social media to find them all!
Happy #TrainingTipTuesday! A few weeks ago I shared the importance of mental stimulation! This week, Brain Games you can play with your dog to not only provide enrichment for your pup but these 2 games will provide bonding and something for you and your pup to do together! Have fun!
Hot or Cold:
Hide a treat, or a ball, somewhere around the room. For the first attempt, you can put it somewhere in plain sight, until your dog understands the rules.
Each time your dog moves in the right direction, say hot and give her a small treat. If she’s not going in the right direction, say cold and don’t hand out a treat.
Your dog will soon start to associate the word hot with moving closer toward whatever you’ve hidden, and you’ll be able to choose harder hiding places, such as behind the curtain or even under a box. This command can also be used during the treasure hunt game.
Cup Game
Get three identical cups from your kitchen, line them up in a row and hide a treat under one of them. Let your dog watch you put the treat underneath a cup so she can see there will be a reward to guessing correctly.
Then mix the cups up – the more challenging you want to make it, the more quickly you move the cups.
Let your dog select the right cup with her nose or paw and lift the cup up. If she is right, she wins the treat!
If she’s not right, mix the cups up and try again. To start with, place treats under all three cups before reducing this down to two and then one. For an extra challenge, don’t lift the cup up. Let your dog figure out how to knock it over to get the treat.
Blog and graphic by Kelly Erick, one of Ruff Start Rescue’s volunteer trainers, who focus on supporting our fosters and helping create successful dogs.

Training Tip Tuesday – Leash Skills (Part 2)

TRAINING TIP TUESDAY – leash skills

By: Margaux Meyer

The Volunteer Trainers at Ruff Start Rescue have started a new initiative to post a quick and easy tip every Tuesday! Look for a new tip every Tuesday or use the hashtag #TrainingTipTuesday on social media to find them all!
We’re back with #trainingtiptuesday for my last installment on leash skills.
Many dogs struggle with reactivity during walks! This can mean they bark at other dogs on walks, lunge at squirrels, growl at dogs behind fences or are scared of bikes or loud vehicles. The best way to handle these issues is to prevent them from happening in the first place. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t walk the dog (although sometimes that is a recommendation), but it means your walk should be managed and vigilant. Training dogs to be desensitized to their triggers can take months or years. The first and most impactful step is reducing the times the dog has those big reactions.
First: Pay Attention— When walking a dog, you should aware of your surroundings. Keep your eyes peeled for any of the dog’s usual triggers and be actively considering a management tactic. When I’m walking a dog that lunges at squirrels, I’m constantly looking for where squirrels like to hang out (trees, bird feeders, that one yard) and adjusting as needed. If there is a house with a lot of trees up ahead, I cross the street before the dog has a chance to notice the squirrel party up ahead. If I’m coming to an intersection where there might be other dogs, I walk slower so I have time to look around the corner to scope it out. As well as looking at your surroundings, pay attention to the dog’s body language to see if they have noticed something interesting: did their ears perk up, are they sniffing the air or staring at something? Dogs typically have a physical tell before they over-react. See if you can notice what the dog does in the second it notices its trigger.
SecondAdd Space whenever you see a potential trigger. Dogs have a “threshold” for most triggers, meaning they can handle the trigger 10 feet away, but once its 9 feet away they get nervous or start barking. Whenever possible, try to maintain a distance from anything that might cause an undesired reaction. This can mean crossing the street to get away from another dog or squirrel filled yard. Sometimes crossing the street isn’t possible, so I will walk into a yard or a driveway to avoid a head on confrontation.
If crossing the street isn’t possible, try and put as much space as quickly as possible by running/jogging/moving quickly. For instance, if I didn’t notice a cat on someone’s doorstep and the dog’s ears perk up and they’re about to start barking. Then, I move away as fast as possible and give treats once I get away. It helps to practice this move away (as talked about in a different #trainingtiptuesday) so your dog knows there are treats at the end. Its okay if you don’t catch the dog before they start barking — continue to move away as quickly as possible and throw them a party once you have enough distance.
Third: Hide/Visual Barrier: Sometimes its not possible to add space or get away from the trigger. When that happens, try to add a visual barrier. For instance, if I’m walking and notice there is someone walking with a stroller and I can’t cross the street, I try and hide behind a car or a bush and let the stroller pass. It is helpful to have treats to distract them and keep them looking away while you’re hiding. When I’m walking a dog reactive to bikes and can’t get away, I will put the dog on the opposite side of me and try to hide behind a car or even a telephone pole so there are two things separating the dog and the trigger. If I am coming to an intersection and notice a dog walking across the street, I will turn around and walk the other direction for a few seconds to let the other dog move farther away before approaching the intersection.
Overall — one of the best ways to help the dog not be reactive is to prevent reactions and reduce the amount of time they spend reacting. They will learn to not be as worried about their triggers if they don’t practice their over-reaction on every walk. Lastly — don’t forget your treats! Bring treats and reward often.
Blog and graphic by Margaux Meyer, one of Ruff Start Rescue’s volunteer trainers, who focus on supporting our fosters and helping create successful dogs. She owns and operates A Better Walk Dog Training (abetterwalk.Squarespace.com).

Did you know that each Ruff Start Rescue transport costs, on average, around $5,000?

Did you know that each Ruff Start Rescue transport costs, on average, around $5,000?

Today, we are asking you to help us sponsor 31 dogs as they make their way north! C.H. Robinson has agreed to match up to $2,500 to sponsor the next bundle of pups coming our way on August 27th.

Every time we transport dogs from overly populated areas in the Houston, Texas, area, it costs us roughly $5,000. With each transport we run, we can save 28-34 dogs – many of which go directly into adoptive homes thanks to our ever-growing Foster-to-Adopt program! The expenses we incur include initial vaccinations, routine veterinary care, and health certificates for the dogs to ensure safe travel. We also garner costs related to travel such as gas, insurance, vehicle maintenance for the van, volunteer lodging, and more!

We are so grateful for the opportunity to help these animals make their way from overpopulated and underfunded shelters in Texas to caring homes here in Minnesota. This wouldn’t be possible without the hard work and dedication of so many supporters. Thank you for your help in sponsoring second chances!

Thanks to C.H. Robinson for their support of this transport! 

Training Tip Tuesday – Potty Training

TRAINING TIP TUESDAY – potty training

By: Maureen Hoopes

The Volunteer Trainers at Ruff Start Rescue have started a new initiative to post a quick and easy tip every Tuesday! Look for a new tip every Tuesday or use the hashtag #TrainingTipTuesday on social media to find them all!
When you bring your pup home, one of the first things you’re going to want to work on is toilet training.
Young pups will need to go to the toilet every 30 minutes to 1 hour or so, depending on the age of the pup. The typical formula is 1 hour for each month of age plus 1 hour. For any new pup coming to your home start with an hourly schedule whenever possible.
Decide where you want your puppy to go to the toilet. Choose an area that is secure and away from distractions that you can easily get to throughout the day. To one side of the back door is a great option most of the time but if you have children make sure it is away from anywhere that they spend time playing.
You’re going to need some supplies –
Firstly, the surface you would like your puppy to toilet on. This can be a zone of real or artificial turf, gravel, bark or any other surface type. You can even set up a toilet zone indoors or in your pup’s pen for when you leave, you’re the pup on their own to prevent them getting stressed or having an accident if they need to go whilst you’re not there.
You’ll also need a weatherproof container of treats that can be stored by the door for easy access rewards whenever your puppy toilets in the right spot.
If your puppy isn’t food motivated, have their favorite toy ready too, so you can reward them with play.
Have poo bags and a bin close by to immediately dispose of your pup’s waste.
And an enzymatic cleaner in a spray bottle to clean up any accidents and fully remove the scent, reducing the likelihood of your pup having another accident in that location
Lastly, you’ll want wipes for your pup’s paws in case they step in anything
Before you start training you’ll want to make sure that your pup isn’t afraid of your toilet zone. A little play session in the area is a great way to expose your pup to their station and make sure they feel confident and comfortable there.
Don’t wait for your pup to cry or whine to let you know they need the toilet, instead set your alarm to take your pup out routinely throughout the day. Take your pup to the same place to toilet every single time. You can walk them there on a lead or carry your pup to their toilet station.
Should your pup have an accident in the house, immediately take them outside to the potty area. Reward if they eliminate in the potty area. Clean up and spray the area to minimize a repeat accident.
When they toilet in the right spot, reward and praise them generously. Have a “potty party”. Get very excited and deliver a jackpot of treats one after another to show your pup how proud you are that they toileted in the right place.
You’ll also need to take your pup out to the toilet whenever they wake up from a nap, eat something, have a drink, do training with you or play.
If your pup toilets outside but not quite in the toilet zone, still reward them but be sure to spray the area where they toileted, with the enzymatic cleaner to remove the scent, making it less likely your pup will toilet in that spot again.
As always, be consistent, actively supervise and reward the right behavior, and your puppy will make great progress. A routine of potty, play and confine will ensure a successful potty-training experience
For more information on potty training go to [Housesoiling | Dog Star Daily] (https://www.dogstardaily.com/training/housesoiling-0)
Blog and graphic by Maureen Hoopes, one of Ruff Start Rescue’s volunteer trainers, who focus on supporting our fosters and helping create successful dogs.

Training Tip Tuesday – Mental Engagement/Stimulation

TRAINING TIP TUESDAY – mental engagement/stimulation

By: Kelly Erick

The Volunteer Trainers at Ruff Start Rescue have started a new initiative to post a quick and easy tip every Tuesday! Look for a new tip every Tuesday or use the hashtag #TrainingTipTuesday on social media to find them all!
This week let’s talk about mental engagement/mental stimulation!
Pacing, whining, destruction, excessive barking, and disobedience can all be signs your dog may be lacking mental stimulation.
We have all heard the phrase, “a tired dog is a good dog!” physical stimulation isn’t always enough as each dog is different and it’s proven that mental stimulation is just as important.
The Canine Enrichment page is an excellent source of ideas to help engage with your pup! Have fun!
Some basic examples of canine enrichment activities include:
  • Playing
  • Chasing
  • Fetching
  • Digging
  • Scavenging
  • Sniffing
  • Shredding & ripping
  • Chewing
  • Licking
  • Solving puzzles
  • Treats under a blanket – just hide them out of sight!
  • Muffin tin ball feeder. Put tennis balls in a muffin tin and hide food under some of the tennis balls.
  • Chop up hot dogs/lunch meat along with dog food and toss into your yard. Let your pup’s nose do the work!
Blog and graphic by Kelly Erick, one of Ruff Start Rescue’s volunteer trainers, who focus on supporting our fosters and helping create successful dogs.
Ruff Start Rescue